WHAT DOES THE
SCORECARD REVEAL?

Some companies are making commendable progress on soy. But worryingly, others
are making no progress at all or are simply hiding from accountability
.

Maned wolf of the cerrado

While there are encouraging signs, the overall results of the 2016 Scorecard are disappointing – as was the case in 2014, when we published the first Soy Report Card.

WWF assessed 133 companies in 9 European countries, up from 88 companies in 5 countries in 2014. While some front-running companies are leading the way on responsible soy, far too many are lagging behind – or hiding from responsibility completely.

MARKET LEADERS

A group of market leaders is using only Round Table on Responsible Soy (RTRS) or ProTerra-certified soy, reducing their impact on forests and other valuable habitats.

Their actions and public commitments demonstrate that it is possible for companies of all sizes and across all sectors to use responsible, deforestation-free soy that does not harm nature or people.

Another group has made commitments on responsible soy and/or deforestation-free supply chains, and started to source it in small amounts, which are good first steps.

It is possible for companies of all sizes and across all sectors to use responsible, deforestation-free soy that does not harm nature or people.

LAGGARDS

Many more companies are lagging far behind. This simply isn’t good enough.

More than half of the companies have decided not to report. In the absence of information, we assume that the vast majority of these companies are not doing anything at all. The fact that only 6 of the 69 non-respondents (9%) are RTRS members, as opposed to 45 (70%) of the respondents, seems to point in that direction.

WWF urges these companies to make their soy use and soy policies public. Transparency is an essential step on the journey to responsible soy. Companies should be accountable for their performance. Information is critical for producers and traders to assess the market for responsible soy – without it, they may not have the incentive to move to responsible soy production.

More than half of the companies have decided not to report. In the absence of information, we assume that the vast majority of these companies are not doing anything for responsible soy.

PROGRESS OF RESPONDENT COMPANIES

Encouragingly, many of the companies and countries that responded have taken steps
toward responsible sourcing of soy:

Started the journey to responsible soy

50%

STARTED THE JOURNEY

32 companies have taken some first steps in the right direction, but still have a long way to go.

Good progress to responsible soy

16%

WELL ON THE PATH

10 companies have made good progress on responsible soy.

Strong commitments to responsible soy

25%

LEADING THE WAY

16 companies have made strong commitments to responsible, deforestation-free soy, and most of the soy they use comes from certified sources.

rtrs-logo.png

70%

ARE RTRS MEMBERS

carbon footprint

84%

CALCULATED THEIR SOY FOOTPRINT EITHER PARTLY OR FULLY

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72%

HAVE REPORTED USING RESPONSIBLE SOY

27 companies (42% of respondents) have committed to responsible soy, while
34 companies (including those that committed to responsible soy) have
made generic “deforestation-free” commitments.

This sends a clear signal to the soy industry and to governments that they are serious about removing deforestation from their supply chains.

For the sake of simplicity, we say “use” to represent how companies can and do support responsible soy through any of the supply chain options available through RTRS and ProTerra. Companies buying RTRS credits or mass balance are not, technically, “using” responsible soy, but they are directly supporting responsible soy production.